David Haussler

 

David Haussler’s work explores the crossroads of molecular biology, mathematics, and computer science. His research has helped revolutionize the field of genomics with the introduction of advanced statistical and algorithmic methods. This work accelerates the understanding of cancer, human development, evolution, and many other areas of active research.

On July 7, 2000, David Haussler and UCSC Genome Bioinformatics Group launched the first working draft of the human genome on the internet, guaranteeing that our genetic code would remain in the public domain forever. They subsequently developed the UCSC Genome Browser, a free, interactive web-based “microscope” that allows you to view any aspect of the human genome at any scale. The Browser supports scientific research worldwide and has served more than five billion to date. Since that time, Haussler’s team of computer science researchers became part of a wider initiative called the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute.

Today, David Haussler’s team adapts to developments in the field they helped create. David Haussler continues as the Genomics Institute’s scientific director and is Distinguished Professor, Biomolecular Engineering. Additionally, he is Scientific Co-Director, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3) at UCSC; he is a co-founder of the Genome 10K Project (G10K) and the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH).

David Haussler is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards for his scientific achievements, including the Dan David Prize. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute HHMI Investigator.

With an overarching goal of developing and sharing infrastructure that supports research in and the clinical application of precision medicine, Haussler is accelerating the understanding of cancer, human development, evolution, and many other areas of active research.

To learn more about David Haussler’s research, visit the Haussler-Salama Lab website.